In Episode 184, Ben and Scott get into Scott’s inability to dive headfirst into iOS 14 and some of the announcements from WWDC and then discuss some new functionality coming to OneDrive for Business.

- Welcome to Episode 184 of the Microsoft Cloud IT Pro Podcast. Recorded live on June 26th, 2020. This is a show about Microsoft 365 and Azure from the perspective of IT Pros and end-users, where we discuss the topic or recent news and how it relates to you. In this episode, Ben and Scott kind of diverge from the Azure and Microsoft 365 news and spend the first 15 minutes talking about various tidbits from Apple's WWDC conference. So if you don't care about their thoughts on apples, skip the first 15 minutes and jump to the second half of the episode where they discuss some recent SharePoint in OneDrive news.

- My brain is still on vacation.

- Yeah, It's still stuck in the mountains of North Carolina.

- It is Georgia, we didn't go to North Carolina--

- We stuck to Georgia. It was almost North Carolina.

- Did you stick to Georgia, did Georgia stick on you? It's a little muggy this time of year.

- You know what? It was actually really nice.

- 'Cause you go into the mountains.

- ' Cause we were in the mountains, like we'd wake up in the morning and it was like 55, 60 degrees and it was beautiful. So we took hikes, let my kids go play in the streams and throw rocks and naturally, because it was cool, we didn't take swimsuits or they weren't wearing swimsuits, so we just let them soak their clothes and they had fun. And then the very last day it was hot so we spent the day playing in the pool that was there on the beach and in boats and social distancing in boats, canoes and kayaks and all that.

- Nice!

- So it was, it was a good break.

- Well, I mean, if you ever do it again and you want, you can always borrow the paddleboards. I have inflatable paddleboards, those are fun.

- I do, so they had some paddleboards there that we could use too and I did not try one. I thought about trying to get my kids on one with me, but I have not actually paddleboarded before.

- All right, let's do a quick thought experiment. You're in a chair, yes?

- So if I can sit in a chair, you're saying I can paddleboard?

- No, quite the opposite. If you can stand up out of the chair and stand without putting your hand on the chair to hold you up, you're probably pretty good.

- I'm pretty good. Well, see I could snowboard and ski and all that, so I could probably do it just fine, but I also wasn't sure how well the paddleboards, like, have you ever put a kid on your paddleboard with you?

- Yeah, kid, yep.

- Okay, I tried the dogs.

- Yeah.

- I See, so yeah, I probably could have done it. I guess we'll have to go do it again, an the excuse to go on another vacation.

- There you go.

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- So Scott, how has iOS 14?

- A completely unrelated Cloud news?

- I can't pull the trigger, I've got the profile.

- Oh, you haven't done it yet?

- No, I haven't done it yet. 'Cause all my devices are daily drivers.

- Oh yeah, that's right.

- Every single one of them and I'm not as brave as you are.

- I though this time your tweets, that you had actually pulled the trigger on at least a device.

- I'm sure I will at some points, I don't know. My biggest concern at this point isn't programs not working, like I would think most of the apps that I need are available as websites anyway. So that's fine.

- Except for Mario Kart.

- No, I don't play Mario Kart.

- Not, not .

- Mario Kart is my only broken app.

- I don't even know why you play that on an iPhone, get a Switch.

- I don't have a Switch that's why I play it on the iPhone.

- Yeah, like that stuff's all fine and fine, okay? But I am also on a set of managed devices. So they're all joined to Intune and things like that. I don't know how Intune is gonna react when it sees iOS 14. And if it considers that an iOS version number, it doesn't know about and then all of a sudden I'm jailbroken and it's a big pain to go backwards and, you know, get a backup, do the IPSW restore and all that kind of stuff.

- It's true. Yes, I was forgetting about the fact that the whole Intune management and that actually cares about build numbers and--

- Who knows if it does, or if it doesn't---

- It doesn't, scientists don't want to be the one to try it. So I'll probably try it with the public beta when it's an even worse time to do it and .

- Yeah, that's what all the companies start locking it down when the public beta is actually out and all of their employees could go do it just easily.

- But public betas aren't too bad. They're usually a dev release or two behind. So the expectation would be that in another week or two, you go from dev beta one to dev beta two. And that takes us into July and then at some point in July, public beta one comes out, but public beta one is really the same build as dev beta two or dev beta three. And then they track behind a little bit from there.

- I feel like there's a company though, it's chart trying to lock it down more once they hit public beta, because you're gonna get a lot more people that go install it once it hits public beta. With dev beta, you're not gonna get as many people that are gonna go try it.

- Well, you're gonna get.

- I don't know, you're gonna get crazy people like you and I, that don't do any type of development on Apple, like I'm not building or releasing iOS apps or Mac apps, but we're paying to be in the dev program. So that we can have access to beta profiles.

- Because we just don't have any patience when it comes to shiny new toys.

- That's it GIF MIC. You know what all I want is my live tiles and my full convergence of iOS, Android, and web iOS. That's all I need.

- I don't like, there's some stuff here. This can cause some controversy, I did not see anything, so I watched the key, well, I did not watch the keynote. I had the keynote playing in the background for WWDC, I did not see anything that was innovative in that entire keynote up until the last 30 minutes. Everything else I looked at and I was like, they ripped that off from Windows phone, from Android, from something else. And then the only, in my opinion, the only really innovative thing or groundbreaking thing they started talking about was their plan to switch from Intel to ARM and to go to all of their own silicone chips. That was the most innovative thing I saw in the entire, however many hours they talked about all of the stuff they're doing.

- Yeah, I mean, we're in the point in the cycle where innovation is tough, but everybody can refine and riff on a series of ideas.

- Right.

- Which I'm totally fine with, like, people complain that like, "Oh, Apple took that from Android "or it came from Web iOS or," whatever it was. Like, yeah certainly there's inspiration to be found there but quite often the Apple way of doing it for better or worse is more refined. Or if it's not more refined, like way more people are gonna use it. Both my parents have Android phones, they don't even know what widgets on the home screen are, but I guarantee you that every single person who has an iPhone, once they figure out widgets are there, they're gonna be lit up and be a thing.

- Right.

- And that's the power of that ecosystem.

- I don't have a problem with that. Like again, I'm loved the widgets, I like the idea. It's not that I'm expecting them to be innovative, I think it's the fact that I feel like a lot of times they sell it as being innovative. And it's this magical new experience of this beautiful thing and--

- Well, that's the job of marketing. That's a different conversation.

- Oh yes.

- You can be like yoga in Spaceballs, it's just merchandising, merchandising, merchandising.

- Yes.

- It's fine. Go do it and do it better and get more people to adopt it and make it simpler but don't sell it as a brand new idea. That's all it is we're making iOS better and you do not need a keynote that long to cover what they did. But anyways, that has absolutely nothing to do with cloud news, that's just me ranting.

- Yes, I mean, there's some fun stuff there and it's kind of exciting. And so you mentioned Apple silicon, so that's gonna bring ARM into the mainstream as well, like today there's all sorts of ARM devices out there. You've got things like iOS devices or iPad iOS devices. So iPhones and iPads and things like that. There's a slew of Andrew tablets like all the, you know, Fire HD tablets, Microsoft has a Surface Pro X or it's an extra 10 underneath, I think it's the X.

- I don't know,

- And so, but that's the ARM-based Surface Pro tablet. So that has been kicking around for a while. But again, it's gonna be kind of Apple potentially bringing it mainstream and lighting some of that up. So that's gonna be exciting as well, like to have kind of a new, fun convergence thing going on.

- Right at least--

- But it's gonna be all locked down in the apply kind of ways. So good luck installing customer OSS and all the things that you're using.

- As soon as I, until it comes to installing my Windows VM on an arm based Mac, like we actually started talking about before we were recording this is that's gonna be a very interesting experience. And even just interesting to see how that develops over the next couple of years and if it can be done, how it can be done, like Mac mentioned some, like they said, "And we're gonna support virtualization." And that was about all they mentioned about virtualization. But if you did look at it, they specifically left out Windows, they focused on Linux. That's gonna be interesting to see what happens to being able to run Windows on something like VMware or parallels on Eback in two or three years time.

- But so the reality of the way that's gonna go is, and I'll put some links to like overviews of the keynote from WWDC. Also put a link to the platform state of the union, which if you watch the keynotes, but you're actually into how the stuff works on the back-end a little bit more, or you want to know a little bit more about it, everybody you should go watch the platform state of the union 'cause that talks about where the SDKs development frameworks are going and how things like virtualization are going to work at least at a high level. So the first time Apple did this, when they went and made the transition from power PC to Intel, they built an entire virtualization engine that they called Rosetta. And this time as they go from Intel over to their custom Silicon, they've got a translation system that they're calling Rosetta 2. So Apple has been on this March for a long time. They've deprecated 32 bits, you know, they've been 64 bit for the last couple of years now. At least for like developers submitting new apps and things like that across every platform. You know, iOS and Mac iOS as well. They're gonna build a translation layer to take you from X 64, x86 instructions over to where they need to be on the other side with Rosetta. So that'll get you through all your apps that you download from the app store, whether it's in the Mac app store, it could be like a DMG, you download off the internet, like that translational go ahead and happen for you. But they're only translating to make, you know, traditional Mac apps run their job, isn't gonna be and they're approaching it in a way where they're not going to translate the entire instruction set for an x86 device. They had a demo in the keynote, I think it was in the keynote, with parallels, which is a piece of virtualization software running Linux. So, but they're running Linux on a kernel that supports ARM's. So they're not having to do all that translation and it just kind of works through 'cause you don't need to rely on Rosetta to get there. And the reality is the, the VMwares of the world and the Apple or VMwares and parallels and things like that, there's nothing to stop them from continuing to offer Windows in their software, but they're gonna have to write the entire translation layer. And who knows if that's a bridge too far. So Apple is gonna provide it up to a point, but you're gonna be relying on the virtualization vendors at that point to do the rest of that for you.

- So another question is, and we did not talk about this ahead of time, the Surface Pro X that's running on an ARM-based processor. In theory, that would be significantly easier than to virtualize on these new ARM based Macs?

- Yes, but that's effectively an OEM version of Windows. So you can't go out today.

- You can't grab that from MSD--

- Right, yeah you can't just go ahead and pull that down. So then it's a licensing thing, would Microsoft allow that? That's certainly a viable path forward, should that happen or come to fruition, but in today's world, that's not where things are at. And there'd be a lot more work that has to be done there. Like windows on an ARM, if you look at like the Surface Pro X, kind of like Apple builds their OSS, it's built in certified for a small number of devices versus Windows on x86, which is, you know, open to the entire world, running it anywhere. Where you look back to even like Surface RT was the first Surface that was on ARM-based and all the problems that people had with that giving apps that would actually work and you could use and, it'll be interesting.

- Yeah.

- So it's gonna be some, some fun times. So if you're into like geeky, things like that, like there's all sorts of fun options out there for you.

- Yes.

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- So should we talk about some cloud-based news now, now that we're done with our iOS news?

- Sure.

- Where there're Mac geeky stuff.

- Yeah, we can do that.

- We can, thanks, I'm glad I got your permission to talk about that. So a new one that I saw, and I don't remember exactly when this one came out is shortcuts to shared folders for one drive for work or school. So this is kind of an interesting one and there is hold out like the article, you and I both flipped through this article about it. And it's slightly confusing when you go read the article and limitations and all of that.

- Yeah, I need you to explain this to me, 'cause I still don't know what it does.

- Well, so I'm not gonna dive into all the technical details of this article, because I need to go like read it slowly from beginning to end, but essentially you and I have different SharePoint tenants, right? So I go share a folder from OneDrive or from SharePoint or from teams, from my work tenant to your tenant. And you now get this invite. You can access the shared folder. And I don't know if you've ever noticed it before, but that essentially shows up under like if you would go to your OneDrive, you would see shared with me. And it would show up as a shared with me folder. But the only place you could really access it was from your web based OneDrive. So now you can take shortcuts and you can pick and choose these folders that are shared with you and add them as a shortcut to OneDrive. And then these shortcuts will appear in OneDrive, on the web and Windows Explorer on Finder, teams, OneDrive mobile apps where ever you have these OneDrive clients, that gives you that ability to kind of sync them, to take them offline even though they're not in your tenant, they're just shared with your account in your tenant. Then this article goes through a whole bunch of different conditions about, well, if you're gonna do this or this, it doesn't work or it's not gonna sunc in this case or like, it doesn't look like it's fully baked in yet.

- Yes, there's a couple of things that like, kind of like you said, limitations or on top of it. So, it looks like it's just, we're shared folders. It's not for individuals shared files, which you know, for better or worse is what it is there, but this brings parody with, I think it's been one of those long standing things with like Dropbox, certainly Google Drive. all of those I can say, I remember when one of the companies I worked at getting our CEO off of Google Drive was nigh upon impossible and we were big proponents of Office 365 internally using Azure bunch. You know, the rest of the company like that was our collaboration solution of choice, we're on Office shop all those things, gonna get the CEO off of Google Drive because all of his other peers that he worked with at like other companies, they would just share a file in Google Drive and it would automatically show up in his Google Drive on his desktop, you know, his synced G drive folder

- Yup

- and it was just there. Same thing happens in Dropbox, somebody shares a folder with you in Dropbox, you'll get a notification in the Dropbox claim. And you know, all of a sudden magically, this folder shows up in your Dropbox. I don't think people even realize that they can move those folders around. Like one of my things like in my Dropbox to keep it organized, I actually keep a big top level folder called shared from others. And then anytime somebody shares a folder with me, 'cause it lands in the route, and I don't like the route to get all messy like that, I'll clean it up and move it over but it still maintains its sharing relationship, all those kinds of things. And to the day, there's a lot of other products that have had this type of functionality and this kind of brings parody, which is a good thing.

- Right, although and I think one difference here though, is you do have to go add the shortcut it's not gonna automatically do this for every folder that's shared with you?

- Yes, well I think that's probably in the case of something like SharePoint, that's not the end of the world 'cause you're gonna have lots of things that show up as shared with you, particularly under that shared context. Because it's not things that have been potentially explicitly shared with you, somebody adds you to a team and that team has backing storage inside of SharePoint Online that shows up as a shared thing with you. Like when you go to, you know, shared--

- When you git to OneDrive.

- Yup, yup. So that's potentially a lot of stuff.

- So yeah, I agree.

- Every site that somebody adds you to, or you get added to a security group and now you're a member of 300 new sites and all of a sudden all those sites sync down automatically, that's like not the greatest thing, but now you potentially have a mechanism to say, "Okay, Ben shared that folder with me. "I would like that folder to be easily accessible "on my desktop through one drive sync. "I'd also like it to be easier to find inside "maybe the mobile clients or the web views, "things like that like, "I don't want to have to go spelunking "where I go to OneDrive in a web browser, "I click on shared and I drill down six levels "to find the thing I want, I just want it right here."

- Right, it makes sense. It's kind of like the fact that you can have access, like you said, to all those SharePoint files and you don't necessarily have to sync every SharePoint site you have access to. This is letting you pick and choose what you want to sync of those things that are shared with you.

- Yes, yes,

- Yes, yes. yes.

- More choice, more flexibility, good things. So is this out today, gradually rolling out in public preview and will be available worldwide by the end of September, 2020. I'm just poking through like, you know, like my test tenant and I don't see it there.

- I haven't tried mine, and I was just jumping into mine as well because I have not shared with me removed from my shared list, yeah, I don't think I have it in mine either yet. So I don't know exactly where it is in that roadmap but like you said, September, I mean, it's beginning of July, July is the next three months. You should have it there.

- Yeah, here's a fun one, here's a fun limitation of thinking about like sharing files and folders and things like that. If you, so all those files are now shared with you in a folder, but they technically live in another user's storage.

- Yup.

- So if you share a folder with me and I sync it to my desktop, if I delete the files from my desktop from the sync, they're also gonna delete your share, which makes total sense, right? Cause that's where the thing--

- Right, I mean, that's the way all the other products work too, right? Well, no, they ask.

- To a certain degree, they ask, right? If I have a shared folder in Dropbox and I go to delete something, it says, "Do I want to delete it just for me?" Like, do I want to remove it from my local storage or do I want to remove it for everyone? Which is different.

- Yes, that is true, I had forgotten that they do ask, and this one, it does not look like yes, they are immediately sent to the recycle bin of the user who shared it with you. There is no prompt that appears.

- Yep, the other fun thing about that is if you read that section about deleting, so this entire article focuses exclusively on SharePoint Online OneDrive for business and Microsoft teams but if you go down to that deleting section, it talks about "OnDdrive.com" a lot, which is the consumer service, has nothing to do with the.

- Oh Oh, Oh, merchandising,

- What shall we do, I got nothing?

- Which I would say you should submit a fix to that article, but it's, since it's not on doc stump like Microsoft

- No it's not on docs yet.

- You can't, well it's support "office.com," which support Microsoft account, which is a different property.

- Yeah, they need all those over to docs.

- I can't just edit things there.

- So another one, since we're talking about the whole OneDrive SharePoint in files, did you see, you can now store really large files? I'm gonna say it anyways, you could start your rip to DVD collection in SharePoint or OneDrive.

- Yeah, you've been able to do that for a while if you're willing to split it up into pieces--

- Well, yeah, but you had to split it up into pieces and you couldn't do like MKV files and some of those you now have up to 100 gigabyte files in SharePoint and OneDrive. Who wants to upload a 100 gigabyte file to OneDriver Sharepoint?

- Yeah, who, who in deed.

- Engineering companies with CAD files.

- But this isn't that new, right? This was announced a while ago, February. They announced this back at Ignite last year.

- It just now rolling out then?

- Maybe.

- cause I saw a bunch of like, I saw it in my message center, but I also saw a bunch of people, like I saw that surface on Twitter in the last week. Oh, so here it is. Maybe if we read the dates in the article, it would help. June 24, 2020 updated the file upload size to reflect that 100 gigabytes is now fully rolled out. So they must've just finished the rollout of it, at some point in time, because it just says the article was updated to imply that it's fully rolled out. Which means some people may have missed it because as that document said, and as we have talked about, and there's another example we pulled today to documentation and what's available does not always line up in the status of certain features.

- True story.

- The documents are at least yes. And it's fully rolled out, you can put 100 gigabyte files in SharePoint, they still recommend that if you're gonna do files that big use the sync client, I also recommend you not do too many of those because if you're using the sync client to sync 100 gigabyte files and you only have a one terabyte hard drive, you can only do about 10 of those files before your entire computer is filled up and that assumes you actually had nothing on your computer already. So I do not know too many people that are uploading 100 gigabyte files to SharePoint but if you want to you can do it.

- Yeah, I mean, I think it depends on what you do and kind of where you're Sitting Jay today. You're probably not working with 100 gigabyte PowerPoint decks, but you know, certainly if you're doing CAD or medical imaging or a bunch of other things, those are pretty big files.

- Yeah, although from the whole speed perspective, I mean, can you imagine doing the 100 gigabyte file with files on demand when you go to open it and you have to download 100 gigabyte file?

- Yeah, it's what it is.

- You're essentially gonna have to do, right? Unless you have a massive amount of storage space on your computer and you're keeping it, I don't know. I mean, obviously there's a use case for it. Somebody wanted it, I don't know what it is. If you want a 100 gigabyte file in SharePoint or OneDrive, can you let us know why, like ping us on Twitter, send us a message, 'cause I'm genuinely curious who wants to upload 100 gigabyte files to SharePoint or OneDrive and how you actually plan to interact those files or what the use cases for storing those files?

- I would bet a big part of it is there's a difference between interaction and saving it for later.

- See, and I can see like an archive type.

- You get a lot of storage effectively as part of your license. And depending on your segment where you say, you probably want to leverage as much of that storage as you can.

- Yeah, but yeah. Backed that whole, should you back up your computer your--

- Computer?

- Yeah. Your entire library.

- See, I still have problems seeing it though, because how many people have, like, what are you backing up? I guess, unless you're backing up videos, maybe you're doing YouTube videos, but even then someone like me, I only have one and a half terabytes of SharePoint storage 'cause it's just me, I don't have a ton of licenses. I don't even know if I have that much. I can't put that many files, I can't back up that much stuff to SharePoint. SharePoint's a expensive backup option.

- Yeah.

- I don't know. It goes back to I wanna know use case. I'm genuinely curious.

- There's gotta be somebody out there somewhere who can help you with that.

- I know, that's why I want them to send us a message on Twitter or something. We'll even bring you on the podcast to talk about your use case for 100 gigabyte files. I'll throw that one out there, and have a guest talking about storing large files in SharePoint and what their scenario is. Oh good times.

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- Should we do one more news article?

- Sure. 'Cause this is one that is a long time coming. This has been painful, the terms store in SharePoint. Remember a good old friend, the term store.

- I love the MMS service.

- It has now been modernized. I don't know that the MMS service in the background has changed at all, but this is, I don't know what stage this is its rollout, they announced this back in April. I think this was around when the SharePoint conference was going to be maybe, slightly before, and I will say, this is a part of project cortex. I think it's part of that whole project cortex while there's a lot of AI stuff bundled into it. This is kind of tied into that as a whole bundle. But now if you go to your SharePoint admin center, hopefully, I don't know that this is 100% rolled out. Now you have a new tenant services option in the new modern, updated SharePoint admin center. Under there, you have term store, which gives you a modernized view of the term store. It's not a new term store, all your old terms are still there, it looks like most of the functionalities there are still around, synonyms and translations and languages and you said--

- All the things that you need to be MMS.

- in adherence with custom properties, right. They like took the term store and just put new skin on it and brought it into the modern UI, which it's a good first step. There's some additional things coming along with it. Like another one that the content type gallery--

- That's kind of a big one is centralizing content type management.

- And that one is one I'm actually, I don't have that in my admin center yet. I only have the modernized term store, but I'm actually looking more forward to the content type gallery being there. I think a lot of people don't even know about it unless you've been in SharePoint for a long time. Because you have to know where it is, which if you haven't it's at slash Content Type Hub, and even some of the permissions sometimes are wonky around it. But bringing this into the admin center and having the Content Type Hub located there and all your content type management and the admin center is a very welcome change. Something that should have been done from the start, in my opinion.

- Yes, yeah. We've talked about this a bunch. You always want it to be there on day one. I do, well, I mean day one, like not even SharePoint Online, like when they first developed MMS and the Content Type Hub, it's always been its own site collection. It should have just been, they should have developed it back in SharePoint 2007, was when the Content Type Hub first surfaced, back then it should have been in central admin. 'Cause it's always been an administrative type feature. I don't know, I guess maybe they were thinking power users who do it and this gave you the ability to just let power users mess with the content type in the Content Type Hub and roll their own by putting it in a site collection that you could set permissions on. To me, it's always been the SharePoint admins that have managed the content types and set them up and helped users configure them and get them published and make sure you don't have duplicate content types and all of that. So those are both coming. Again I've seen the term store more and more, I have yet to the Content Type Hub shop shop in my admin center.

- Yeah, I haven't played with that one. Not that I have much of a need to these days but--

- Yeah, when was the last time you've actually played with SharePoint administration, let's be honest?

- About two weeks ago, two weeks ago.

- All right, well, I'm glad you were able to play with it two weeks ago I was doing the Math in my head.

- I'm not in there everyday, like you are.

- Yes, 'tis true. So I think that wraps it up for today. I don't have a whole lot else unless there's one of these other ones you wanted to mention.

- No, no that's good, but that makes a good show.

- We'll put something in the intro' to let people not to skip the first 15 minutes that they don't care about Mac stuff.

- Well, they should all care about that.

- They should because we care about it. And just like everybody should have everything they want, everybody should care about the same things we care about. No, I'm just joking, don't send me angry tweets tweets.

- Tweet "@Ben." If anybody needs his email address, tweet at me, I'll let you know it.

- And I will give you my new email address.

- "[email protected]"?

- Yes, "[email protected]" Do you own "Scotthogue.com" or to somebody?,

- I don't, somebody else, somebody else has that one, that's unfortunate.

- All right, well with that, we will call it a wrap for today and we will talk to you next week.

- Sounds good, thanks Ben.

- All right, thanks Scott.

- If you enjoyed the podcast, go leave us a five star rating in iTunes. It helps to get the word out so more IT pros can learn about Office 365 and Azure. If you have any questions you want us to address on the show or feedback about the show, feel free to reach out via our website, Twitter or Facebook. Thanks again for listening and have a great day.

Sponsors

  • ShareGate – ShareGate’s industry-leading products help IT professionals worldwide migrate their business to the Office 365 or SharePoint, automate their Office 365 governance, and understand their Azure usage & costs
  • Sperry Software – Powerful Outlook Add-ins developed to make your email life easy even if you’re too busy to manage your inbox
  • Office365AdminPortal.com – Providing admins the knowledge and tools to run Office 365 successfully
  • Intelligink – We focus on the Microsoft Cloud so you can focus on your business

Show Notes

About the sponsors

sharegate_logo_2018_600x300 Every business will eventually have to move to the cloud and adapt to it. That’s a fact. ShareGate helps with that. Our industry-leading products help IT professionals worldwide migrate their business to the Office 365 or SharePoint, automate their Office 365 governance, and understand their Azure usage & costs. Visit https://sharegate.com/ to learn more.
SperrySoftwareLogo Sperry Software, Inc focuses primarily on Microsoft Outlook and more recently Microsoft Office 365, where a plethora of tools and plugins that work with email have been developed. These tools can be extended for almost any situation where email is involved, including automating workflows (e.g., automatically save emails as PDF or automatically archive emails that are over 30 days old), modifying potentially bad user behaviors (e.g., alert the user to suspected phishing emails or prompt the user if they are going to inadvertently reply to all), and increased email security (e.g., prompt the user with a customizable warning if they are about to send an email outside the organization). Get started today by visiting www.SperrySoftware.com/CloudIT
Intelligink.com Logo Intelligink utilizes their skill and passion for the Microsoft cloud to empower their customers with the freedom to focus on their core business. They partner with them to implement and administer their cloud technology deployments and solutions. Visit Intelligink.com for more info.